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"Quiet: the Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking"

May 08, 2012 by PatLeach
I took a break from my Notable Books reading for "Quiet: the Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking" by Susan Cain. I'd heard some interviews with her earlier this year, and found her comments intriguing.

And then I had to wait awhile because there were (and are!) quite a few holds on it.

Cain's title tells it all--she supports and values the combination of traits that characterize introversion--needing solitude for recharge, preferring one-on-one conversations over cocktail parties, focusing on one topic at a time, and a tendency for active environments to be overstimulating.

She includes research, cultural aspects, advice for romantic pairs and advice for parents.  Cain herself isn't a researcher, but has interviewed many who are, and she has done plenty of homework in seeking out a variety of opinions.

An introvert myself, I connected with many of her observations. In particular, I saw myself in her description of the need to gear up for certain kinds of social events, almost as if going into battle. On the other hand, I haven't sensed the scorn or disapproval of the extroverts in my life as much as she seems to have, and sometimes I felt like she "protested too much." A personal note--I do clearly recall my college boyfriend kindly pointing out that my quietness at parties could be interpreted as my being stuck-up. And he did say so kindly. And I still remember that--it stuck with me. I would guess that quite a few introverts have received similar observations.

I'll recommend this book to people who are interested in the many ways in which personality can be profiled, so that we understand ourselves better, and get along with others better. I'm finding myself having extended animated conversations with others who've read this--and so far, her audience seems mostly--introverts.


Tagged in: Good Reads, nonfiction, memoir, Lit,
Comments: 0

Mary Karr's "Lit"

November 20, 2011 by PatLeach
I finished "Lit" by Mary Karr just over a week ago. I'm nervous when writing about a book more than a few days after finishing it. I'm the kind of reader who tends to forget whole portions of even the books that I enjoy the most. In my defense, I do retain strong mental files of particularly riveting scenes.

This is the third of Mary Karr's memoirs. I was introduced to (and loved) her "The Liar's Club" when it made the ALA Notable Books list in the mid 1990's. I confess that I didn't finish the second, "Cherry."

Karr is a well-regarded poet and professor. But it didn't come easy. "The Liar's Club" tells about her crazy childhood in Texas, with a mother suffering from mental illness and an alcoholic father. But one-sentence summary doesn't begin to convey the richness of language, story and affection that her parents provided. Her storytelling seems always to reflect that intense Southern background, well-chosen words rollicking with energy.

In "Lit" she turns to her own demons of alcoholism and depression. Karr married a fellow writer, the son of a wealthy East Coast family, and when they had a son together, things seemed destined for happiness. Karr finds herself drinking steadily as she cares for her colicky baby, and eventually she sees that she can't just give that up. Quite a bit of the book happens amid the tension of her knowledge of her problem and her unwillingness to give up extreme self-medication. When she does give in, she bolsters her resolve with a turn to religion, to Roman Catholicism.

The scene I'll remember from "Lit" is Karr up in the middle of the night carrying her crying baby, her unfinished drink from earlier in the evening pulling her into the kitchen, where she craves what she'll feel when she swallows what remains. That's not the "madonna and child" that we expect.

Karr addresses the skepticism that she expects many of her writing friends will heap on the 12-step process, and on religion. Early on, she seems almost apologetic that she's finding the language of recovery helpful, even effective. As she continues, she conveys greater comfort there.

I'll certainly recommend this to friends who enjoy memoirs--and Karr continues to be one of the best memoirists around. I'll be interested to hear what friends who've struggled themselves with addiction and mental illness will say about "Lit." But I don't want to convey that this is limited just to narrow segments of readers. Karr excels in memoir. She crafts her story in such a way that it is much more than just her own.


Tagged in: Good Reads, nonfiction, memoir, Lit,
Comments: 1


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